If you’re anything like me, you probably get nervous easily and may find yourself feeling anxious more often than not. I don’t mean the supposedly healthy, fight or flight response that nature and/or God designed to spring us into action in the midst of danger to protect us from harm. I mean serious and constant anxiety, which is more of who we are than a symptom, or the acute and sudden terror of panic attacks and the subsequent fear of when or where the next one might strike. Of course, the infinite paradigm of possible scenarios or outcomes for any given situation, would seem utterly insane to someone without this personality type. The irresistible urge to know “why”, “how”, and find out every possible detail about anything we do or topic we discuss likely drove friends, loved ones, and significant others crazy until they finally accepted, if not understood, how our over active minds work. ūüėČ

You may know that social anxiety is linked to¬†a high intelligence¬†or that there‚Äôs a neurological correlation between being¬†highly creative and mentally ill¬†but what you may not know is that worrying ‚Äď and overthinking in particular ‚Äď has now been linked to creative genius. The pattern here is unmistakable: many of what people consider their worst traits are actually just the shadow sides of their greatest strengths. (What a thing to consider)¬†In light of the latest research, here‚Äôs a breakdown of why worrying incites genius ‚Äď and how maybe you can tap into it yourself.

http://thoughtcatalog.com/brianna-wiest/2015/10/8-reasons-why-overthinkers-and-worriers-are-usually-creative-geniuses-according-to-science/

I ran across this great article by Julie Zeilinger on Identities.Mic.

Some disabilities aren’t exactly visible. They don’t require a wheelchair, a hearing aid or any other piece of equipment that helps us know to give up our seats on the subway or not shake our heads when we see a seemingly able-bodied person park their car in a handicap parking spot.

In fact, about 20% of people in the U.S. live with a disability,¬†according to the 2010¬†U.S. census, but millions of those individuals live with what’s commonly referred to as “invisible” or “non-appearing” disabilities like depression, epilepsy, chronic pain disorder or learning disabilities.

These disabilities may vary in terms of severity or¬†symptoms, but the people who live with them have one thing in common: They often encounter others who don’t know these disabilities exist at all, and even more resistance to understand what it’s like to live with these issues.

Here are six things people who live with invisible disabilities want people to know about what their experience is like ‚ÄĒ and, most importantly, how others can best understand and support them.

http://mic.com/articles/122187/5-things-you-must-know-about-the-disabilities-we-can-t-see

Wow! I REALLY needed to read this right now. I have been struggling with an all-consuming and suffocating guilt which literally takes my breath away at times. Most of my guilt and regret originate from mistakes that I made years or even decades ago but somehow I have always managed to hurt those I love and cherish the most and no matter how much time passes, the scars in my heart remain. Still even more of those feelings continue to rise out of situations over which I have no control.

My anxiety and depression are at an all-time high and the panic attacks that I managed to control for years have returned with a vengeance.

If I could drill the words of this quote into my heart and mind, perhaps I could over-power and move past the pain which haunts my heart and tortures my mind.

Positive Outlooks Blog

The beauty of life is, while we cannot undo what is done, we can see it, understand it, learn from it and change so that every new moment is spent not in regret, guilt, fear or anger but in wisdom, understanding and love. ‚ÄĒ Jennifer Edwards

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Indisposed and Undiagnosed

#1 Only the old get sick:
Illness does not discriminate.
We are fair game.

#2 Looks reflect feelings:
If you bumped into me in the street, you would not think that I was suffering.
I may appear to be okay, maybe a little tired, but on the inside my muscles are aching, my head is spinning, my stomach is churning.
What needs to be known is that I can leave my house looking decent, but feeling absolutely terrible.

#3 Stress reduction techniques cure illness (ie exercise, meditation, yoga):
When people hear that you are unwell, they assume that the things that usually provide average people with a better wellbeing, will help you. This includes Exercise, Meditation, Diet Change, Juice Cleanse & Detox, Yoga etc.
This is incorrect. I encourage the Chronically Ill to try these, as they may provide a temporary relief for symptoms, but they are not a cure!

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I LOVE this! It is a perfect follow-up to the broken parts of myself that were expressed in my blog post yesterday. I am trying to teach myself to adapt to the limitations of chronic illness and pain and I WILL learn to weave my own parachute out of those broken pieces. It may take time, some trial and error, and a lot of baby steps but I believe we can all get there if we set our minds to it.

Bloomin' Uterus

Parasail_lahaina

We made it through another week! Yay!

Today’s Feel Good Friday quote is by American poet, William Stafford:

‚ÄúI have woven a parachute out of everything broken.‚ÄĚ

I absolutely loved the visuals that came when I read this one.  So many times we allow the brokenness of our dreams, expectations, desires, and life to bury us.  We need to embrace the suck, stand back up, and go.  Use it to soften the landing, propel you forward, to go places, to better ourselves, and to help others.

Not strong enough to build your own parachute?  Find a friend who is going through the same thing.  Join a support group.  Know that you are not alone in your sorrow or suffering.  Together you can weave a beautiful tapestry and a strong parachute.

May you have a wonderful weekend.

Yours, Lisa

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Our last family cruise vacation was in 2012. Only 1 month after my last surgery for Endometriosis. It was our 3rd cruise. A whole week on the open sea, with my husband and my parents, visiting some of the most beautiful parts of the world I’ve ever seen.

We booked another cruise the following year, on the largest, most amazing ship so far, but had to cancel due to my hubby’s chronic pain and the mounting medical bills that come with both of our invisible illnesses. That was a heart-breaking choice but one that we had to make.

Our family cruises have been, by far, the best days of my life. I hope and pray that we will be able to cruise again. Having those moments to look forward to are so very important when your lives are filled with the challenges of chronic illness and to anyone for that matter.

I have to believe we will cruise again. I don’t know when and I don’t know how, but until we do I will be cherishing the memories of the amazing times we had. ‚̧

The Travel Voice by Becky

It is no secret that this travel journalist is a fan of cruising. Sometimes it is just me and the hubby, while other times it may be the whole family…either way, it is always the cornerstone for great memories and fantastic value!

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Everyone always asks why I love cruising so much, so I compiled a list of the five top reasons why I love to cruise. Sure, there are more, but these characteristics are always common across all fleets.

  1. Value. Cruises offer an all-inclusive vacation adventure with lots of bang for the buck, especially if you cruise during the times of the year when kids are in school. Prices are higher during summer months and holiday seasons when children are on school break, so if you can make it any other time, you are likely to find a BARGAIN! Cruise prices include everything you need to have a great vacation…good food with lots of choices, activities…

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