Love this idea!!!

Making Invisible Illness Visible

OK, I think I’m finally physically able to start getting ready for work. Better late than never.

Chronic illness sucks!!! 😞

I ran across this great article by Julie Zeilinger on Identities.Mic.

Some disabilities aren’t exactly visible. They don’t require a wheelchair, a hearing aid or any other piece of equipment that helps us know to give up our seats on the subway or not shake our heads when we see a seemingly able-bodied person park their car in a handicap parking spot.

In fact, about 20% of people in the U.S. live with a disability, according to the 2010 U.S. census, but millions of those individuals live with what’s commonly referred to as “invisible” or “non-appearing” disabilities like depression, epilepsy, chronic pain disorder or learning disabilities.

These disabilities may vary in terms of severity or symptoms, but the people who live with them have one thing in common: They often encounter others who don’t know these disabilities exist at all, and even more resistance to understand what it’s like to live with these issues.

Here are six things people who live with invisible disabilities want people to know about what their experience is like — and, most importantly, how others can best understand and support them.

http://mic.com/articles/122187/5-things-you-must-know-about-the-disabilities-we-can-t-see

Being in pain is quite uncomfortable for most people. Even minor pain, such as a stubbed toe or a paper cut, is unpleasant but that pain fades relatively quickly. Imagine being in pain that never fades, or that fades only to come back a few hours later. What would that do to a person? This is what people with chronic pain have to deal with every day. Continue reading

Oh Endometriosis, how do I hate thee?  There are countless ways.  Far too many to list.

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At the moment, I hate that I am still awake (painsomnia) after midnight on a Sunday night / Monday morning, when I have to be up in only a few short hours to start getting ready for another busy work week.
I worked 50 hours last week, and close to the same the week before, and my body is paying the price. I guess I can’t blame you for that, as I already know my limitations.

My hubby and I are going through some intense stress right now due to situations involving lawyers, the broken disability system, and doctors, which probably isn’t helping my pain levels.
I do thank you for staying away (for the most part) during the past few weeks, when I needed the ability to work and focus, especially since my evil ATN decided to morph into what feels like a migraine, in addition to the typical 24/7 pain that it has so generously provided for the past few years.

You also waited until after my Dad’s birthday dinner yesterday, so I was granted the opportunity to enjoy spending a little quality time with my parents.40c8c0662f5904301ba15b170abadcad

You probably know that I needed to work from home this weekend and I would have appreciated you allowing me the opportunity to do that, but I guess I can’t expect you to stay away forever since we are apparently bound for all eternity.

If I could ask of you one favor, it would be for you to ease up enough for me to get at least a little sleep tonight and make it to work tomorrow.

I could not possibly agree more! 🌼 Great post! 🌼

My Brain Hates Me

“In the 18th century, the French philosopher Voltaire said, “Doctors are men who prescribe medicines of which they know little, to cure diseases of which they know less, in human beings of which they know nothing….” He also opined that “…it is dangerous to be right on matters on which established authorities are wrong.” If he were alive today, writing a tome on pain medicine, it would be easy to imagine Voltaire describing physicians as people who withhold medications of which they know a great deal, to manage painful conditions of which they have learned even more, in human beings who perceive them as knowing nothing, amidst a regulatory climate that scares the hell out of them.

In the 21st century, it is ironic that although we have made significant advances in our understanding of how pain affects the nervous system and continue to develop innovative treatments, many pain sufferers…

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Is My Invisible Illness Visible?

I almost can’t help but find some twisted amusement, as my invisible illness (the namesake of this blog), seems almost visible these days.

There is no doubt that I have not been myself lately.  As I mentioned in a previous post, I am desperately struggling to function through heightened anxiety, depression, panic attacks, and all around emotional instability.

I seem to have lost all ability to control my emotions, and even worse, my reactions and the words which spew uncontrollably out of my mouth, unfiltered, and without prior thought or regard for my surroundings and others in my presence.  My stress level seems to have taken a toll and my body and mind are doing as they please, despite my constant resistance.

Not only are these changes in my personality visible (and often embarrassingly audible ~ LOL) to those around me, but my appearance has undeniably been going downhill. Continue reading

Indisposed and Undiagnosed

#1 Only the old get sick:
Illness does not discriminate.
We are fair game.

#2 Looks reflect feelings:
If you bumped into me in the street, you would not think that I was suffering.
I may appear to be okay, maybe a little tired, but on the inside my muscles are aching, my head is spinning, my stomach is churning.
What needs to be known is that I can leave my house looking decent, but feeling absolutely terrible.

#3 Stress reduction techniques cure illness (ie exercise, meditation, yoga):
When people hear that you are unwell, they assume that the things that usually provide average people with a better wellbeing, will help you. This includes Exercise, Meditation, Diet Change, Juice Cleanse & Detox, Yoga etc.
This is incorrect. I encourage the Chronically Ill to try these, as they may provide a temporary relief for symptoms, but they are not a cure!

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