Chronic Pain Comes with Fatigue?

This is SPOT ON! I have horrific fatigue, which I have always had a tendency to blame on Endometriosis but I am starting to realize that chronic pain in general can cause it. I have pushed myself beyond the reasonable limits of my chronic illness and pain for a very long time. I have slowly been learning to adapt and adjust but I can feel the effects of over-doing it for so long and I seem to be going downhill quickly. Stress worsens both the chronic pain and fatigue so much that I have been nearly incapacitated as of late. My anxiety and depression are out of control and I feel like I am on the verge of or possibly in the early stages of a nervous breakdown. Thank you for this post. I believe that our health depends on recognizing the fatigue that comes with chronic pain and accepting whatever adjustments are necessary to allow for adequate rest. Rest certainly won’t cure the chronic fatigue but it may help to avoid doing additional damage to our already compromised bodies and minds. 💜

Just a Girl with Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia

Chronic Pain Comes with Fatigue? Chronic pain comes with fatigue? You bet it does.

And because of this, I am a completely different person now. Being in constant pain is difficult yes, but no one mentions the extreme fatigue that comes along with it. I can no longer do the things I used to. I used to work full time, keep the house clean, run errands, have a social life, get things done – do things a normal person would do with ease, but I am different now. Along with the pain, fatigue consumes my whole being and it’s very difficult to say the least.

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I made a decision the week before last.  In the midst of an Endometriosis flare-up, I decided that I was going to push through and force myself to go to work and complete my normal daily activities, NO MATTER WHAT.  Well, as long as it was physically possible anyway.  I have had many flare-ups that render me completely, 100% incapacitated and during those I would not have been able to simply “will my way through it.”  This one however, I could and so I did.

Did I succeed?  Yes.

Did I feel good about myself?  Yes.

Was it a good idea?  In hindsight, no.

Do I regret it?  Yes and no.

Will I do it again?  I’m not sure yet. Continue reading

I’m supposed to get a massage at 1:00 pm today.  I’ve been looking forward to it for days.  It’s one of the only things that eases my Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia pain which seems to originate in my neck from Degenerative Disc Disease, or so my pain specialist believes.

I had to miss work yesterday and don’t feel any better today.

I woke up to a stabbing, tearing, ripping pain in my lower left quadrant.  It feels like my ovary is stuck to my lower intestine and my GI doctor said it probably is, from either Endometriosis or scar tissue and adhesions.  Now I’m dealing with the gastrointestinal consequences and it sucks.

The fatigue takes my breath away.  When they say that Endo can cause fatigue as severe as that experienced by those with end-stage cancer, they are not kidding.  It is real.  I can barely move.  I have no idea how I’m going to take a shower, shave, and get ready for this massage.

Seven reasons why Endo-Fatigue causes so much trauma to its sufferers

Yes, yes, and yes. AMEN!

survivingendometriosis

Have you recently been tired? Have you recently been endo-tired? If yes, you’re very likely to know the difference. Explaining how you feel to the rest of the world is a different matter altogether.

“It can’t be endometriosis that’s making you feel so tired. Are you sure you don’t have cancer or something?”

“I’m too busy to ‘rest’ like you do.”

“I admit you’re not well, but stop ‘revelling’ in it.”

Renunciation and attack are common reactions. Onlookers simply refuse to believe that a person can be so excessively tired because of endometriosis, so they come up with alternative explanations: You’re lazy. You’re feigning it. You’re exaggerating it. You’re just feeling sorry for yourself. You don’t want to face up to your life. There must be something else wrong with you.

My experience has been that most people, including me, the sufferer, are, initially at any rate, unaware of this…

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Chronic Illness, working and recovery days

This post describes living and working with chronic illness and chronic pain SO well. I felt like I was reading about my own life. The parallels are endless.

lovemylifeanyway

When you have a chronic illness you lose the control over your body, your physical wellness, that you used to take for granted.  One particular problem I have is balancing work, rest and everything else.  It would be ideal if I could work four or five days a week and then have enough rest time to ease off my symptoms so I could continue working happily the next week. Of course, this presumes there are only two things to consider, work and rest.  There are many more things to consider obviously and that is one part of the problem.

Energy is very limited in my life.  It is very easy to “overdo it”. Sometimes five days of work is too much.  If I encounter extra stress, a night out, an after-work work commitment or a sixth day of work or effort on the sixth day (say, a child’s birthday party…

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A Blessing and a Curse

Sometimes God works in mysterious ways.  Over the weekend, my parents delivered an entire week (or more) worth of food; prepared, cooked, and ready to heat and eat.

Here is a photo of our feast, which includes chicken, meatloaf, vegetable soup, lasagna, breadsticks, beef noodle casserole, beans, organic salad, and more.  YUM!  Needless to say, I have been eating a lot more than usual this week, trying to replenish some of the nutrients that my usual poor eating eating habits have robbed me of.

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As I have mentioned before, I often follow an anti-inflammatory meat, dairy, and gluten free diet.  However, this week I will be treating myself to what whatever I want to eat.  Honestly, I haven’t been sticking to my diet in quite a while.  I think it’s OK to stray from the diet sometimes and if someone else is preparing a meal or we are eating out at a restaurant, I typically indulge on whatever I like.

I think my parents worry about Billy and I not eating enough, which is a reasonable worry considering the fact that I’ve lost 35 pounds since my chronic pain became constant.

They also know that both Billy and I battle with such severe pain and fatigue that, during an acute flare-up, simple tasks like cooking can quickly become impossible.  Continue reading

Working with an Invisible Illness & Chronic Pain

If someone asked me what my greatest challenge was, with regard to living with an invisible illness and chronic pain, I wouldn’t even have to think twice before I answered “working.”  The reasons are likely obvious to anyone who has a chronic illness and/or lives with chronic pain and those reasons are MANY.

We never know how we are going to feel from one minute to the next, let alone one day to the next.  For me, something ALWAYS hurts.  Not just a little annoying pain, but severe, debilitating pain.  Luckily my brain seems to process primarily one pathway of pain signals at a time.  This means that the most severe source of pain is what I feel at any given moment.  Sometimes that is facial pain due to Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia or Atypical Facial Pain (the doctors keep switching back and forth between these diagnoses) and TMJ/TMD, which feels like someone has placed a needle into my upper right teeth without ever taking it out.  That pain radiates into my cheek, temple, head, and neck.  Sometimes it starts in my neck and radiates outward from there.  My other source of chronic, invisible pain is in the abdominal region due to Endometriosis, PCOS, Endosalpingiosis, and abdominal adhesions.  I usually just refer to it all as “Endo” for the sake of simplicity.  This is often the most debilitating pain of all because it is peritoneal quality pain, which has a tendency to affect a large portion of the body (stomach, abdomen, pelvis, lower back, and upper legs/thighs).  Sometimes it is only a dull ache (my facial pain is usually more severe during those times), but other times it causes severe stabbing, cramping, ripping, crushing, and tearing pain which can bring me to my knees, cause nausea, severe GI symptoms, make it hard to breathe, and even cause me to pass out.  Many compare Endo flare-ups to acute appendicitis or even labor contractions.  It leaves the body in a constant state of inflammation and causes my abdomen to swell to the point of looking pregnant at times.  All of this also causes a debilitating fatigue, which research has shown often reaches a level experienced by those with end-stage cancer.  When that happens, it feels like my arms, legs, and other body parts are carrying around 100 pound weights (which is more than my total body weight).  These are just some of the physical symptoms.  The psychological and emotional symptoms are another monster all their own.  Imagine trying to concentrate on work, completing complex or even mundane daily tasks, dealing with co-workers, attending meetings, managing stress, and meeting deadlines while feeling this way.  Sound tough?  It is.  This is the best way that I know how to describe it but even these words don’t do it justice.  Continue reading