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Happy Anniversary

Happy belated 7th wedding anniversary to my love, best friend, soul mate, and husband Billy.

Our official anniversary was yesterday, but we BOTH forgot until today. LOL! Anyone who knows me personally will know that I NEVER forget holidays, birthdays, anniversaries, etc. so this is a perfect example of what chronic pain and the subsequent stress, anxiety, and depression that it causes, will do to someone. Continue reading

Chronic Pain Comes with Fatigue?

This is SPOT ON! I have horrific fatigue, which I have always had a tendency to blame on Endometriosis but I am starting to realize that chronic pain in general can cause it. I have pushed myself beyond the reasonable limits of my chronic illness and pain for a very long time. I have slowly been learning to adapt and adjust but I can feel the effects of over-doing it for so long and I seem to be going downhill quickly. Stress worsens both the chronic pain and fatigue so much that I have been nearly incapacitated as of late. My anxiety and depression are out of control and I feel like I am on the verge of or possibly in the early stages of a nervous breakdown. Thank you for this post. I believe that our health depends on recognizing the fatigue that comes with chronic pain and accepting whatever adjustments are necessary to allow for adequate rest. Rest certainly won’t cure the chronic fatigue but it may help to avoid doing additional damage to our already compromised bodies and minds. 💜

Just a Girl with Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia

Chronic Pain Comes with Fatigue? Chronic pain comes with fatigue? You bet it does.

And because of this, I am a completely different person now. Being in constant pain is difficult yes, but no one mentions the extreme fatigue that comes along with it. I can no longer do the things I used to. I used to work full time, keep the house clean, run errands, have a social life, get things done – do things a normal person would do with ease, but I am different now. Along with the pain, fatigue consumes my whole being and it’s very difficult to say the least.

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What Is Endometriosis?

Most people think of endometriosis more or less as a synonym for bad menstrual cramps, but the condition is more serious than that. It involves tissue from the uterine lining implanting itself outside the uterus.

The condition affects 1 in 10 women.

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“Endometriosis reaches far beyond the uterus by sneaking up the tubes or through the blood or lymph systems. It goes other places like cancer, and because it’s the body’s own material, it’s not rejected,” said Dr. Tamer Seckin, a gynecologic surgeon who co-founded the Endometriosis Foundation of America.

“People are committing suicide because of this, because it’s not recognized and there are no good treatments and people get blown off,” said Dr. Peter Gregersen, a geneticist with the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research in Long Island who is researching endometriosis.

Continue reading this Healthline article here: http://www.healthline.com/health-news/personal-painful-ordeal-of-women-with-endometriosis-061815#5

I ran across this great article by Julie Zeilinger on Identities.Mic.

Some disabilities aren’t exactly visible. They don’t require a wheelchair, a hearing aid or any other piece of equipment that helps us know to give up our seats on the subway or not shake our heads when we see a seemingly able-bodied person park their car in a handicap parking spot.

In fact, about 20% of people in the U.S. live with a disability, according to the 2010 U.S. census, but millions of those individuals live with what’s commonly referred to as “invisible” or “non-appearing” disabilities like depression, epilepsy, chronic pain disorder or learning disabilities.

These disabilities may vary in terms of severity or symptoms, but the people who live with them have one thing in common: They often encounter others who don’t know these disabilities exist at all, and even more resistance to understand what it’s like to live with these issues.

Here are six things people who live with invisible disabilities want people to know about what their experience is like — and, most importantly, how others can best understand and support them.

http://mic.com/articles/122187/5-things-you-must-know-about-the-disabilities-we-can-t-see