Taking The Veil Off Of Domestic Violence

Woman Takes A Selfie Every Day To Document The Worst Year Of Her Life

1 in 4 women will experience a form of domestic violence in their lifetimes.

Whether it’s physical or emotional, abusers leave their victims feeling helpless, ashamed and worthless. To raise awareness, a Serbian ad agency created a PSA back in 2013 called “One photo a day in the worst year of my life.” In it, a woman takes a photo every day for a year to document the abuse she has endured.

The woman’s face looks fine at first, but as time goes on, bruises and black eyes appear on her face and neck. At the end, she holds a sign that reads “Help me, I don’t know if i will be here tomorrow.” And it’s true — according to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, one third of all female homicide victims died at the hands of their partners.

Although this video went viral a year ago, the message still resonates for this National Domestic Abuse Awareness Month. It’s an epidemic and it shouldn’t be swept under the rug any longer.

A PLUS Positive Journalism 

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Endo Fact of the Day – Day #5

For more information about this topic, click here to view a publication by The Lancet Oncology.

This is a little scary to me, as I have already been diagnosed with Endosalpingiosis in addition to Endometriosis. Until reading this publication, I had no idea Endosalpingiosis was in any way associated with ovarian cancer.

I wanted to share the following link to a fantastic article by Libby Hopton, as featured on Mind Body Green.

If you have Endometriosis, or more importantly, if you have a friend, family member, or co-worker who has it, please take a moment to read this.  It might shed some light on what your loved one is going through and allow you to understand and relate to her a little bit better.

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-11318/what-i-wish-everyone-knew-about-endometriosis.html

Blogging 101 : Introduce Yourself!

Hi everyone!  I am taking The Daily Post’s Blogging University courses somewhat in reverse order.  I completed Blogging 201 last week and today I’m excited to begin Blogging 101.

Please bear with me as I participate in another Blogging U course, as I will likely publish posts as a part of some assignments.  While they may not always be directly related to my usual topic, hopefully they will be educational and/or interesting to those who have a desire to learn more about blogging.  At the very least, they will help me learn how to become a better blogger, which is a “win-win” situation for everyone.

 Today’s assignment: write and publish a “who I am and why I’m here” post.

I still consider my blog relatively new, but I am amazed and delighted at how quickly it seems to be evolving each day.  I’ve already learned a lot and gained quite a few awesome followers, so I am very happy with its progress.

The main topic of my blog is chronic illness and chronic pain.  The conditions that I will concentrate on the most are those which are not visible to the naked eye, which is why I titled the blog Invisible Pain Warriors.

I write about the daily struggles of living with chronic illness and chronic pain, occasionally touching on infertility, how these issues affect my husband and I in our daily lives, how other are affected, tips on how to deal with various issues associated with chronic illness and chronic pain, along with our challenges and triumphs along the way. Continue reading

MY PERIOD Story! Living with Endometriosis | Infertility Awareness by Stephanie St. James

Don’t be fooled by the title of this video.  For many women, including me, Endometriosis is light-worlds away from a disease that is only problematic during menstruation.

My experience started out in my teenage years, with intermittent but agonizing pain during my period, however the severity of the pain was so intense that I never even associated the two.  It took years for me to realize that the excruciating and debilitating pain flare-ups, which would bring me to my knees or curled up in the fetal position, sometimes causing loss of consciousness and sending me to the emergency room, had anything to do with my monthly cycle.  My pain was so profound during those times that I could not even tell where it was coming from, which makes sense now knowing that peritoneal quality pain can encompass so much of the lower body.

It really wasn’t until my late twenties and early thirties, when infertility became a factor, that I started to connect the dots.  Honestly, I suspected Endometriosis before that time (and even mentioned that suspicion to my doctors), but as far too many women experience, my symptoms were not taken as seriously as they should have been and were often dismissed by doctors, leaving me to suffer in silence with no answers, diagnosis, or treatment. Continue reading

Trigeminal Neuralgia Awareness Day

October 7, 2014 is Trigeminal Neuralgia Awareness Day.

I have been suffering from severe and constant facial pain for approximately 3 years.  It has been diagnosed as many things, one of which is Trigeminal Neuralgia.  Because I have received so many different diagnoses for this pain, and have one Neurologist who changed his diagnosis after several months of treatment, I am somewhat uncertain as to what I really have or who I should believe.  I usually say that I have a chronic facial pain syndrome, but most likely what I have is Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia, which is sometimes called Type 2 Trigeminal Neuralgia (TN2) or ATN.

Since today is Trigeminal Neuralgia Awareness Day, I wanted to share some facts about this life altering condition.

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The following information is from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (http://www.ninds.nih.gov).

What is trigeminal neuralgia?

Trigeminal neuralgia (TN), also called tic douloureux, is a chronic pain condition that affects the trigeminal or 5th cranial nerve, one of the most widely distributed nerves in the head. TN is a form of neuropathic pain (pain associated with nerve injury or nerve lesion.) The typical or “classic” form of the disorder (called “Type 1” or TN1) causes extreme, sporadic, sudden burning or shock-like facial pain that lasts anywhere from a few seconds to as long as two minutes per episode.  These attacks can occur in quick succession, in volleys lasting as long as two hours.  The “atypical” form of the disorder (called “Type 2” or TN2), is characterized by constant aching, burning, stabbing pain of somewhat lower intensity than Type 1.  Both forms of pain may occur in the same person, sometimes at the same time. The intensity of pain can be physically and mentally incapacitating.

The trigeminal nerve is one of 12 pairs of nerves that are attached to the brain. The nerve has three branches that conduct sensations from the upper, middle, and lower portions of the face, as well as the oral cavity, to the brain. The ophthalmic, or upper, branch supplies sensation to most of the scalp, forehead, and front of the head. The maxillary, or middle, branch stimulates the cheek, upper jaw, top lip, teeth and gums, and to the side of the nose. The mandibular, or lower, branch supplies nerves to the lower jaw, teeth and gums, and bottom lip. More than one nerve branch can be affected by the disorder. Rarely, both sides of the face may be affected at different times in an individual, or even more rarely at the same time (called bilateral TN). Continue reading