If you’re anything like me, you probably get nervous easily and may find yourself feeling anxious more often than not. I don’t mean the supposedly healthy, fight or flight response that nature and/or God designed to spring us into action in the midst of danger to protect us from harm. I mean serious and constant anxiety, which is more of who we are than a symptom, or the acute and sudden terror of panic attacks and the subsequent fear of when or where the next one might strike. Of course, the infinite paradigm of possible scenarios or outcomes for any given situation, would seem utterly insane to someone without this personality type. The irresistible urge to know “why”, “how”, and find out every possible detail about anything we do or topic we discuss likely drove friends, loved ones, and significant others crazy until they finally accepted, if not understood, how our over active minds work. 😉

You may know that social anxiety is linked to a high intelligence or that there’s a neurological correlation between being highly creative and mentally ill but what you may not know is that worrying – and overthinking in particular – has now been linked to creative genius. The pattern here is unmistakable: many of what people consider their worst traits are actually just the shadow sides of their greatest strengths. (What a thing to consider) In light of the latest research, here’s a breakdown of why worrying incites genius – and how maybe you can tap into it yourself.

http://thoughtcatalog.com/brianna-wiest/2015/10/8-reasons-why-overthinkers-and-worriers-are-usually-creative-geniuses-according-to-science/

I love this post! It’s such a great reminder of something that most of us too often forget. 🙂

GentleKindness

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There is a great healing that comes along with accepting ourselves just as we are. You are not a compilation of your mistakes. You are the beautiful person inside that is more meaningful to life than you realize.

Once we can do that then we can begin to explore who we can become. We do not have to be entrapped in a perception that because we have not done things in the past that we cannot do them.

Others say things about us. They label us, describe us, talk about us. They tell us what we can do, what we can’t do, what we should do.

They advise us on our careers, families, religious beliefs.  Other people’s opinions can limit us if we choose to believe their perception of us. 
They can  limit our potential.
They…

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