It’s not you, it’s my illness

YES! This is brilliantly written and so very true. 💜

Finding my Miracle

I wrote this piece a couple of weeks ago and then since it seemed so personal I was hesitant about posting it. Instead, I sent it to The Mighty, because naturally when you’re feeling a bit shy the logical thing to do is expose yourself to an even wider audience. I know it seems a bit counter intuitive, but it felt more anonymous that way. The response I received, though, made it clear that I’m not the only one who feels this way, and since I happen to be feeling this way today, I’ve decided to now share it here.

Loving someone with a chronic illness comes with some extra challenges. Illness is unpredictable, and the important people in our lives understand this. They learn to be flexible and accommodating and we love them for it.

While it might be easy to understand why we’re not always up to going out or carrying…

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Breaking: Disturbing Video of David Stojcevski Dying in Jail Cell over Unpaid Traffic Tickets

This is horrific! I just learned about it today and the more I research and learn about the details of the situation, the more sadness and disgust I feel. I’m also reminded of a serious need for the public to take action when avoidable tragedies of this type occur at the hand of authorities. We have to speak out, share these stories to ensure that our families, friends, and those who read our blogs are aware of incidents which may never reach their local news. I’m not sure what it will take for a true positive change to take place, but I am sure that it will require unity and the hard work of our citizens, standing together to make a difference.

Distract and Conquer

Another victim of the prison industrial complex.  A man who understandably couldn’t pay a $772 ticket fine was jailed in Macomb county, Michigan.  A nurse recommended he be placed in “medical drug detox unit“…however he was placed in a jail cell and then ultimately a mental health cell with 24 hr surveillance.  Stojcevski was seeing a doctor that prescribed medication so he can kick his addiction.  So without his medication, he was suffering from a withdrawal and later died.  This is the most disturbing footage/news story you’ll see.

This is absolutely unacceptable that a man dies over unpaid traffic tickets.  Just another example of what’s wrong with our justice system.  People continue to die over petty violations while murderers, domestic terrorists, and rapists live in prisons.  And no, All Lives Matter people, he did not deserve to die for not paying a ticket.  I know the area he’s…

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Article by WNDU

More than six million American women and girls struggle with endometriosis, a chronic condition that causes pain before and after their periods. It can also cause infertility. In some cases, endometriosis is difficult to diagnose, but a new imaging method may shed light on difficult to detect cases.

Twenty-eight year old Susie Veech has spent more than half her life in the kitchen. She’s a food service consultant and a budding caterer.

Susie also spent more than half her life trying to figure out the source of the monthly, searing pain in her side. Veech told Ivanhoe, “Eleven, on a scale of one to 10, the pain.”

Veech had endometriosis. The tissue normally lining the inside of her uterus was also growing on the outside and blocking other organs.

Gynecologist and co-director of the Endometriosis Center and the Minimally Invasive Surgical fellowship program at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Kevin Audlin, MD, is studying a new imaging technique designed to help gynecologists detect endometriosis. Traditionally, doctors use a minimally-invasive tool called a laparoscope to look for tissue.

“Full spectrum light looks just as if we would see. If you’re looking into a belly, you’ll see organs, most everything is either a yellowish or a pink,” Dr. Audlin explained.

In addition, Dr. Audlin is testing special lighting called narrow band imaging. When he presses a button on the laparoscope, the light changes, making endometriosis stand out.

Dr. Audlin said, “The red hue tends to be the endometriosis, the green we see tends to be the actual vasculature.”

For Veech, finally a diagnosis followed by a procedure to keep the endometriosis at bay. She said, “When everyday pain goes away, you have tons of energy. You don’t realize how much it’s weighing you down.”

In a study of 150 women undergoing the laparoscopic procedure for endometriosis, researchers found the addition of narrow band imaging improved detection by 20 percent. Dr. Audlin says the narrow band imaging offers another avenue for women who have had chronic pain but are not showing signs of endometriosis with traditional screening.

To read the research summary, click here.

 

Chronic Pain Comes with Fatigue?

This is SPOT ON! I have horrific fatigue, which I have always had a tendency to blame on Endometriosis but I am starting to realize that chronic pain in general can cause it. I have pushed myself beyond the reasonable limits of my chronic illness and pain for a very long time. I have slowly been learning to adapt and adjust but I can feel the effects of over-doing it for so long and I seem to be going downhill quickly. Stress worsens both the chronic pain and fatigue so much that I have been nearly incapacitated as of late. My anxiety and depression are out of control and I feel like I am on the verge of or possibly in the early stages of a nervous breakdown. Thank you for this post. I believe that our health depends on recognizing the fatigue that comes with chronic pain and accepting whatever adjustments are necessary to allow for adequate rest. Rest certainly won’t cure the chronic fatigue but it may help to avoid doing additional damage to our already compromised bodies and minds. 💜

Just a Girl with Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia

Chronic Pain Comes with Fatigue? Chronic pain comes with fatigue? You bet it does.

And because of this, I am a completely different person now. Being in constant pain is difficult yes, but no one mentions the extreme fatigue that comes along with it. I can no longer do the things I used to. I used to work full time, keep the house clean, run errands, have a social life, get things done – do things a normal person would do with ease, but I am different now. Along with the pain, fatigue consumes my whole being and it’s very difficult to say the least.

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The Loss of Lifetime Love

Tonight we are visiting with a friend who stopped by, out of the blue, to let us know that his wife passed away this morning. It was unexpected. She suffered from chronic pain, but nothing that was considered life threatening, until now.

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It sounds like this condition had been affecting her for quite some time and progressed undiagnosed until it was too late. 😢

I have a very hard time comprehending situations like this one. I can’t imagine the pain that he will feel when the shock wears off.

I couldn’t do it. I wouldn’t survive. Continue reading