Being in pain is quite uncomfortable for most people. Even minor pain, such as a stubbed toe or a paper cut, is unpleasant but that pain fades relatively quickly. Imagine being in pain that never fades, or that fades only to come back a few hours later. What would that do to a person? This is what people with chronic pain have to deal with every day. Continue reading

Oh Endometriosis, how do I hate thee?  There are countless ways.  Far too many to list.

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At the moment, I hate that I am still awake (painsomnia) after midnight on a Sunday night / Monday morning, when I have to be up in only a few short hours to start getting ready for another busy work week.
I worked 50 hours last week, and close to the same the week before, and my body is paying the price. I guess I can’t blame you for that, as I already know my limitations.

My hubby and I are going through some intense stress right now due to situations involving lawyers, the broken disability system, and doctors, which probably isn’t helping my pain levels.
I do thank you for staying away (for the most part) during the past few weeks, when I needed the ability to work and focus, especially since my evil ATN decided to morph into what feels like a migraine, in addition to the typical 24/7 pain that it has so generously provided for the past few years.

You also waited until after my Dad’s birthday dinner yesterday, so I was granted the opportunity to enjoy spending a little quality time with my parents.40c8c0662f5904301ba15b170abadcad

You probably know that I needed to work from home this weekend and I would have appreciated you allowing me the opportunity to do that, but I guess I can’t expect you to stay away forever since we are apparently bound for all eternity.

If I could ask of you one favor, it would be for you to ease up enough for me to get at least a little sleep tonight and make it to work tomorrow.

I could not possibly agree more! 🌼 Great post! 🌼

My Brain Hates Me

“In the 18th century, the French philosopher Voltaire said, “Doctors are men who prescribe medicines of which they know little, to cure diseases of which they know less, in human beings of which they know nothing….” He also opined that “…it is dangerous to be right on matters on which established authorities are wrong.” If he were alive today, writing a tome on pain medicine, it would be easy to imagine Voltaire describing physicians as people who withhold medications of which they know a great deal, to manage painful conditions of which they have learned even more, in human beings who perceive them as knowing nothing, amidst a regulatory climate that scares the hell out of them.

In the 21st century, it is ironic that although we have made significant advances in our understanding of how pain affects the nervous system and continue to develop innovative treatments, many pain sufferers…

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Misunderstood

There are many moments these days when I feel very misunderstood.  I have always been a little quirky and not exactly a social butterfly, who excels in human interaction.  Perhaps that is why I chose to stick with governmental accounting for my career.  There are no interpretations necessary when it comes to data. Things are almost always black and white.  Dealing with the social aspects of working with people however, is another issue entirely. Continue reading

TheDiaryofaSickGirl

The touchiest subject of them all.  Medical Insurance.  Specifically medical insurance in the United States.  Now a days of course it’s almost considered politically uncouth to bring the subject up amongst acquaintances, but I’m going there.  I can ramble off statistics about medical bills being the number one cause of bankruptcy and why it is so important to get universal health care in this country.  I could tout of all the reasons why the arguments against universal health care are ridiculous.  How if you think medical care would go down hill or waits would be longer for appointments etc. you may be delusional as we already have those issues, it’s just we have to pay for it out of our pockets. Out of pockets or out of taxes it’s all the same.  But it’s not.  It’s financial suicide for the people in this country.  Medical Insurance companies have all the…

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How much stress can a person endure before they start to break; physically, mentally, emotionally, psychologically?

With every blessing or moment of progress and hope, it seems as though another pending disaster is on the horizon.

I have thrown myself into exercise lately because it is something I can control. A part of my life that I can reclaim and when I do it, I feel good, in many ways. It has been helping.

Despite that positive change, there are so many things that I cannot control and that is becoming obvious at this moment.

I’ve gone from feeling feeling strong, despite my pain, to feel feeling helpless and scared, once again.

I’m turning to Yoga and Qigong in an attempt to help. Hopefully they can eventually provide an outlet for my anguish so I can meditate through the destruction and ease this feeling of impending doom.

Maybe I will go to Unity Church tomorrow, where I take the Qigong classes. There are some crises and burdens that are to heavy to bear on our own. Sometimes I believe that only that only a higher power can help lift the heavy weight and help us carry it or help carry us when we can no longer carry ourselves.

Exercise and Chronic Pain

HealthSkills Blog

ResearchBlogging.org
One of the most consistent recommendations in cognitive behavioural therapy approaches for chronic pain is for people to exercise. Exercise is thought to help reduce pain, improve physical fitness and support participating in social, professional and domestic activities. By being fit people can manage their daily activities at a lower percentage of their maximum aerobic capacity and, hopefully, minimise the risk of flare-up.

While the overall premise of exercise is clear, the details of how often, what kind and the best approach for recovery after exercising are rather less. The problem for people with chronic pain is that moving HURTS.  Some people have even argued that chronic pain is, in essence, an activity intolerance disorder.

Daenen, Varkey, Kellmann & Nijs (2014) have attempted to clarify the state of play in exercise for chronic pain, and propose some interesting guidelines for clinicians. You see, one type of chronic pain is not…

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Seeking Motivation

Attention fellow spoonies!  We are seeking your thoughts, ideas, advice, coping techniques, and wisdom!

We all know that chronic illness and pain (invisible or otherwise) can and will steal endless things from our lives.

Sometimes it can teach us a few positive things as well, such as a different outlook on life, the ability to appreciate the small things, a greater sense of compassion, more empathy for others, a desire to advocate for our ourselves and others, learning to listen to your body, better eating habits, patience, etc. but what chronic illness takes from us often feels like so much more (because the reality for most of us is that it takes WAY more than it gives).

As I have mentioned before, one of the most difficult and heart-wrenching things that it has taken from my life is the ability to look forward to something;  ANYTHING!  This seems to be a recurring theme and problem that I continue to struggle with.

Continue reading

I made a decision the week before last.  In the midst of an Endometriosis flare-up, I decided that I was going to push through and force myself to go to work and complete my normal daily activities, NO MATTER WHAT.  Well, as long as it was physically possible anyway.  I have had many flare-ups that render me completely, 100% incapacitated and during those I would not have been able to simply “will my way through it.”  This one however, I could and so I did.

Did I succeed?  Yes.

Did I feel good about myself?  Yes.

Was it a good idea?  In hindsight, no.

Do I regret it?  Yes and no.

Will I do it again?  I’m not sure yet. Continue reading

Endo Fact Finale – Days #26 – #31

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Thank you all for participating, reading, sharing, educating, learning, and helping to raise awareness during Endometriosis Awareness Month.  I think it has been a huge success.  We have reached a lot of people, gained followers, made new contacts, discovered new blogs, and met some friends along the way.

I hope that all of my Endo Sisters will continue to raise awareness, not only during the month of March, but throughout the entire year as we continue to fight for better prevention and a cure for Endometriosis.

❤ Wishing you all a pain free day ❤