The NeverEnding Story

I must once again apologize for my random absences, missed weakly features, and sporadic posts.  Since our main topic is chronic illness and pain, I am confident that our followers can relate to and sympathize with my recent occasional bouts of being bedridden, feeling incapacitated, sick, in pain, and unable to post as frequently as I would like or had planned.

My editorial calendar is filled with interesting, educational, and helpful topics which would better appeal to the masses but my rather unexpected and new health issues which have developed over the past few weeks have taken center stage and caused my blog to take on more of a diary format for the moment.  I am going with it for now, as I find it helpful and supportive to share our individual journey, as well as other topics along the way.  Some periods of time may lean in one direction more than the other but our goal remains the same.

During my last update about my current GI journey, I believe I shared and explained some complications or side effects that I experienced for several days following my recent ERCP and pancreatic bile duct stent placement.

My gastroenterologist, despite him being highly skilled and me being forever indebted to him for most likely saving my life, seemed to be lacking in the area of follow-up care after the ERCP procedure.  I was never given a follow-up appointment and did not know exactly what would be found or done during the procedure, which obviously will have an effect on a patient’s recovery.  The issue of follow-up care has since improved but at the point in my journey which I’m describing here, that is very much how I felt.

I believe I spoke with both my doctor and another GI specialist (the latter two, three, or more times) after I woke up but we all know how the side-effects of heavy sedation or anesthesia can affect eliminate your memory.  I have no recollection of speaking with my doctor and only remember two out of the three (or maybe four) times that I spoke with the GI doctor on-call at the hospital.

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